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Thread: Antique Bamboo rod question

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    not many Bamboo Rods are longer than 8'
    As DA stated, the vast majority of older rods were 8.5'-9.5'. Although I agree that nymphing is better with a longer rod, and the weight of bamboo can be a bit much in longer sizes.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwvd View Post
    Why do you think they made "extra" tips?
    Actually, extra tips were meant to be alternated in use so that a "set" would not occur in a tip. Or in some cases, the two tips differed slightly. A lighter tip for dries and a heavier tip for subsurface flies or a line weight heavier. I think with the advances in building technology, they really aren't needed, they're just tradition now.

    Quote Originally Posted by jwvd View Post
    Do you gents fish with your cane rods? I understand they are beautiful but what good is a rod if you are afraid of it! Sorry if I sound rude but it is a beautiful thing to be used NOT put on a pedestal and stared at! ---John
    What he said.

  3. #13
    sotlowski Guest

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    While all of mine get fished from saltwater to steelhead none get abused. These rods just don't preform very well nymph fishing. As Catch said the longer lengths tend to be heavy in hand and at times a bit soft in the upper 1/3 of the rod. When you finally start your search for a classic bamboo rod and you finally find one, I marvel at the care that was taken by those before me to maintain that rod just as it was built some close to a century ago. At point of purchase I am the rods caretaker until I pass it on to the next, it'd be disrespectful to those caretakers before me if I used it in a way other than it was intended. "Afraid of it" never, actually amazed at their strength.
    And Catch, I had read that Glen Brackett once to demonstrate how durable his rods were threw a set of blanks on the floor of the shop and let one of his clients wives step on them in her heels.......Stan

  4. #14
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    Thank you for the information. YES I do nymph fish but I have found even with the old Heddon Bamboo that it wasn't capable of tossing huge weighted stone fly nymphs. My main goal in a new "old" bamboo rod is dry fly and some soft hackle or small nymphs size 14 or smaller if any at all. I myself tie down to 22 and even that is rough on my eyes, and yes I do have an optivisor. That said I appreciate all the help and information I have gathered here and I went to that classic fly rod site and they definitely know their stuff. Thanks again---John

  5. #15
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    Take a breath JWVD. I don't baby my rod. I use it as much as I can. I bought it for small streaming....It's 6'-6", but I use it on the Farmy all the time because it casts like a dream....(Thank you infinitely once again Andy Manchester). My 9 year old caught her first fish ever on it 4 years ago, so it's not even close to being on any pedestals. I do however take very good care of it. There's a lot more care that goes into maintaining them than with fiberglass or graphite, because the latter two don't deteriorate. You can case your graphite or glass rods wet if you want and it won't damage the finish (unless you're using them in salt, of course.)...Bamboo, being a natural material, needs a little extra care. If you mar the finish on you bamboo rod, eventually you'll get water under it, which will create a weak point where it will eventually fail....I am guilty (because I love using it so much) of using my bamboo rod to nymph, against the wishes and direction of Mr Manchester, when he sold it to me.....It's currently being repaired because it broke from being dinged by a beadhead nymph. The ding was barely noticeable to the naked eye, but it did enough damage the it caused slow deterioration in that spot. I was speaking from experience, not from lack of it. I'm having the original tip section repaired plus a spare made, just in case.
    GAWN FISHIN'.... <*((((((((><

  6. #16
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    Take a breath? And what are you implying? I came here for information, not an argument. I appreciate all the information I have recieved BUT I am not hot headed so this take a breath I would normally consider an insult. So my friend maybe YOU should "take a breath"!

  7. #17
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    Let's all take in a deep one...and keep what is a very informative thread on topic.
    “We fish for pleasure; I for Mine, you for yours.”
    — James Leisenring

    I promise this doesn't suck: currentseams

  8. #18
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    Get yourself a 8.5 foot granger or phillipson if you want a vintage bamboo rod that will do anything. Either will use a 5 weight and toss dries, wets and nymphs. Heddons are great too, but you really need to know what you're looking for with them, they came in a wide variety of sizes and quality levels
    There is nothing about bamboo that makes it any better or worse than graphite. A graphite rod is a far superior fly fishing tool, but a bamboo rod is much better fly fishing instrument.
    Last edited by leadwingcoachman; 06-25-2014 at 08:42 AM.

  9. #19
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    A good bamboo rod is a dream to cast. Good luck in your search.

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