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Thread: New guy.

  1. #21
    Rich Strolis Guest

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    I will say this though, one can practice casting without any water. A small parcel of open space in a back yard can be the beginnings of working out the kinks in casting. As for methods to start out with thats a matter of opinion. From past experiences guiding, indicator nymphing is probably in my honest opinion the easiest method to get people to learn and catch fish at if shown properly. I have had many a trip with clients who have never even held a flyrod walk away with a respectable number of fish after even a 1/2 day outing, and more often than not continued to fish afterwards. Indicator nymphing can be very easy to pick up, one doesnt need to get overwhelmed by casting when using tension casts and proper techniques in mending. And the indicator is a great tool for people to see the takes of a fish. I have found the learning curve much easier than starting people off throwing dries and streamers. Lets face it, you dont even really need to cast when tension casting. Becoming proficient with dries and streamers entails the angler to be a decent caster, which like I said before can be practiced without water. I think if I was to start from scratch I would have started out nymphing as opposed to chucking dries and streamers. Most people get overwhelmed by the casting aspect from day one. My suggestion is to hook up with someone who 1). Has the experience in the sport and can give you a casting lesson, and 2). can take you out on the water and show you the techniques I speak of. You will catch fish if they are a good teacher, and that will get you hooked so to speak. Good luck, and lastly, just my 2 cents.

  2. #22
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    Of course, casting isn't easy. It's actually quite tricky. Like learning to work a clutch or play a guitar. Which is good, because it's a wonderful thing when it comes together, over time.

    No quick and easy fixes. It wouldn't be worth it otherwise.


    K

  3. #23
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    This again shows how different and varied people's experiences can be, and how different and varied the sport can be.

    I can only speak from my own experiences. Fishing with nymphs, split shot, and indicators was a total disaster for me when I first started. Of course, that's because I was self taught. I didn't have a guide or instructor to teach me, and my "mentor" Rich, was a dry fly guy. He actually discouraged me from nymphing at all, and at the very least he totally discouraged me from using split shot or indicators. To this day, the only way I've ever seen him nymph is with a single bead head hares ear, (not even a Gold Ribbed Hares ear), no shot or indicator, swung like a wet fly.

    When I did use shot and indicators, I didn't realize that one wasn't supposed to cast them overhead, in the traditional sense of fly casting. I didn't know anything about water hauls, tension casts, roll casts, and thought all casting was done in one way. So you can imagine the mess I usually made out of my rig... ;) :D

    The only drawback to starting out roll casting and water hauling with nymphs is that it doesn't allow you to practice the overhead cast. But if the beginner can execute the roll casts and water hauls required for nymphing (which are admittedly easier than overhead casting), then that certainly seems to be the best way to start catching fish. I agree with Rich on that.

    Casting on the lawn or in a park is an excellent idea! As is the farm pond/bluegill pond! My problem was, I honestly didn't know where to find one where I would have enough room for a back cast. Besides, I didn't WANT to know.... I wanted TROUT DAMMIT! ;) :D So I struggled for 6 weeks on the Farmington till I got that first fish.

    If you have a farm pond or bluegill pond in which to play around, that's a great suggestion. And by all means practice on the grass.

    I read an article by Lefty in Flyfisherman magazine years ago about teaching new casters. He said to start off with a short length of line.... about two rod lengths. Lay it straight out on the grass, then practice picking it up in a back cast, and laying it out in a single forward cast. That's it. Pick it up, put it down. No false casting. (This is a good idea anyway, and a good habit, because many if not most of us do too much false casting anyway. There's no fish in the air, they're all in the water, and we're trying to catch fish, not birds. ;))

    A beginner's tendency is to drop the back cast too low. Something I found that worked for me when I started, was to envision throwing the line UP rather than throwing it BACK. Many texts and instructors talk about moving the rod from 10 o'clock to 2 o'clock. But actually, that's the arc through which you want the TIP to move. So your wrist, and hence the rod butt, is going to move more like 10 or 11 to 1. You have to get the rod to flex.

    Speed up, accelerate, to a stop. Like throwing darts. And stop on the back cast sooner than you think you should.

    After you practice with that short length of line, add a few feet and do it some more.

    Gradually, add a false cast. ONE and only ONE false cast.

    Add some more line, and add one more false cast..... so on and so forth, until you reached about thirty to forty feet of line.

    Then you have to learn to shoot line.... but that's another lesson... ;) :D

    I'm sure others will have other techinques for learning, but that was what I read from Lefty, combined with some of my own experiences, and that was what worked for me...

  4. #24
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    I'll add to Jim's POV on varied experiences. Although I started out fly fishing with dries (it was July after all) my first real success came the following spring while nymphing. I didn't have a mentor or instructor; I taught myself by reading every book and article I could get my hands on, and going out and practicing throughout the winter. When spring came, I was ready. And I started catching large numbers of fish straight away.

    I think nymphing came so easy to me because of my years fishing bait on the bottom (this is where 3weight's and my paths diverge). But perception is reality, and despite mine and WNP's POV that indicator nymphing is indeed a fine place for a beginner to start, I've learned that the vast majority of anglers don't feel that way. I can definitely see Jim's point about casting; if you were trying to emulate a dry fly casting stroke with two flies and some shot, and had no one to teach you, you'd be in trouble fast.

    FWIW, I think roll casting with an indicator/weight/nymphs is another recipe for the tangle-o-matic. Hence the "Four L" method (not my creation) in my article.

    Jim, I couldn't agree with you (and Lefty) more about starting with a short bit of line. That would absolutely make it easier to learn.

    So, Big Biscuit: feeling overwhelmed yet? ;-)
    “We fish for pleasure; I for Mine, you for yours.”
    — James Leisenring

    I promise this doesn't suck: currentseams

  5. #25
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    Hello BB
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    Tight Lines and First Loops
    Andy M

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Fisherman View Post

    FWIW, I think roll casting with an indicator/weight/nymphs is another recipe for the tangle-o-matic. Hence the "Four L" method (not my creation) in my article.
    Other than when I first started, I've never had a problem roll casting with indicator/shot/multiple flies. But for a beginner, yeah, that could definitely be a problem. I think the reason I haven't had problems with roll casting a nymph rig is that I usually fish a real short line, less than 20 feet, so I'm not trying to move alot of line. And I try to make a nice wide loop.

    I suck at roll casting anyway .... but I often use it when I'm nymphing to reposition my cast, or mend line, or to get the line out straight downstream before water hauling (ala the four L's) back upstream. The four L/tension cast/water haul is definitely the preferred cast for nymphing....

  7. #27
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    Well i just picked up the Orvis fly-fishing guide.Looks like a good read.This will clarify a few things for me.I can't wait to go out and try some of the lessons I'll be reading about.Well I'll have plenty of time to read the book before I put into practice.I've read some of the older threads and they gave me an idea as to what flies to use.Well I have to go my Queen beckons.

  8. #28

    Default Rottweiler dog Training

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    Reward based training is the basis for Rottweiler Dog Training. Start training your Rottweiler puppy as soon as possible.

  9. #29
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    3M has some great videos
    The man who coined the phrase "Money can't buy happiness", never bought himself a good fly rod!

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